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Poison control officials with the University of Kansas Health System say they’ve seen a recent uptick in calls regarding vaping products.Specifically, parents are calling with worries about kids ingesting or touching vaping cartridges or solutions.“We’ve had kids eat the cartridges, drink the solutions and get sick,” said Dr. Stephen Thornton, medical director for the University of Kansas Health System Poison Control Center. In the past three weeks, the poison control center has received nine calls specifically related to young kids found with an e-cigarette or vaping pod where children were not actually vaping.”Parents are calling saying, ‘Hey I found my kid holding the vaping product,’ or ‘I found the kid with the e-cigarette pod in their mouth.’ So we’re actually having a bit of an uptick in that, along with having reports of these vaping associated pulmonary illnesses,” said Dr. Elizabeth Silver, clinical toxicologist with the University of Kansas Health System Poison Control Center. “We’ve had kids ingest that and they get pretty bad toxicity from the nicotine because it’s very, very concentrated in those little pods.”Doctors recommend treating vaping products like drugs — keep them out of reach of children. For more information or advice about vaping from poison control officials, click here.

Poison control officials with the University of Kansas Health System say they’ve seen a recent uptick in calls regarding vaping products.

Specifically, parents are calling with worries about kids ingesting or touching vaping cartridges or solutions.

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“We’ve had kids eat the cartridges, drink the solutions and get sick,” said Dr. Stephen Thornton, medical director for the University of Kansas Health System Poison Control Center.

In the past three weeks, the poison control center has received nine calls specifically related to young kids found with an e-cigarette or vaping pod where children were not actually vaping.

”Parents are calling saying, ‘Hey I found my kid holding the vaping product,’ or ‘I found the kid with the e-cigarette pod in their mouth.’ So we’re actually having a bit of an uptick in that, along with having reports of these vaping associated pulmonary illnesses,” said Dr. Elizabeth Silver, clinical toxicologist with the University of Kansas Health System Poison Control Center. “We’ve had kids ingest that and they get pretty bad toxicity from the nicotine because it’s very, very concentrated in those little pods.”

Doctors recommend treating vaping products like drugs — keep them out of reach of children.

For more information or advice about vaping from poison control officials, click here.

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